The Method Method

41R7XrgaSpLThe Method Method: Seven Obsessions That Helped Our Scrappy Start-up Turn an Industry Upside Down

I recently finished this. Here are a few of the quotes I liked:

Innovation:

“In order for an innovation to be truly innovative, people have to use it. A lot of people. As (Green) innovators, nothing is more frustrating to us than hearing about an innovative new product only a few privileged people can get their hands on. That’s not innovation. That’s obscurity. Which is to say, technology and creativity aren’t the most important components of innovation – adoption is.” (p. 98)

Private Label: 

“Gone are the days when the private label was considered an inferior choice. The Great Recession has forced a shift in consumer thinking toward cheap chic – the idea that it’s hip to be frugal – which has shattered negative consumer stereotypes of private label goods. Today’s private label competes against national brands on both price and differentiation.” (p. 160)

Needs/Wants/Desires:

“The desire to feel cool by buying a top-of-the-line convertible is not satisfied by just buying the car and parking it in the driveway. It’s fully realized when you actually go out and drive it with the top down! Bottom line: It’s not the product that fulfills the desire, it’s the experience of using it. Now in order to really get people to desire your product, you need to create a great experience. What’s a great experience? It’s one that’s memorable, remarkable, or unexpected in some way. It’s what keeps people coming back to you instead of your competitors.” (p. 184-185)

Customer Experience:

“If you look at which consumer product companies are really winning today, you’ll see they’re all great at product execution – Apple, Dyson, Nike, BMW, just to name a few. The world is shifting toward favoring organizations that are fluent at creating truly great products, particularly products that deliver consumer experiences as he meaningful differentiator…Everything starts with creating a killer product, after that everything flows naturally.

“I wish more money and time was spent on designing an exceptional product, and less on trying to psychologically manipulate perceptions through expensive advertising.” Phil Kotler, professor of marketing, Kellogg School of Management” (p. 188)

Expectations:

“Our belief was that if we created a product that exceeded expectations, people would talk about it and drive word-of-mouth. Because Method could never win the advertising battle by shouting louder, we needed the product to shout for us. Too many companies create products with the assumption that a healthy marketing budget will ensure success. But we believe you should go into a new product development process with the assumption there will be no marketing support and that the product needs to be special and differentiated enough to stand on its own. Marketing should be the rocket fuel to propel a great product, not the Hail Mary for a mediocre product.” (p. 190)

Product Experience:

“Think about it: design a better product and what do you have? One good product. Design a better experience, however, and you’ve got a platform for countless products. This is, in part, why Method has been able to grow so quickly, disrupting each new category with the same strategy. Product experience is about being refreshing to consumers. It’s about looking for areas where we can be distinct.” (p. 193)

The Method Method can be purchased at Amazon.